Returning to Work: From the frying pan into the mire

The commute

My poor blog has been more neglected than a bikini line in winter. 

I’ve been working full-time you see, and I’ve also been letting things fall through the cracks.

Like many working women, I am still holding the domestic space together while trying to cope with the demands of full-time work. (This survey found that working women generally still do + 17 hours of  housework per week compared to men’s – 6 hours . Hang on, what?)

I’ve managed to forget music lessons and food shops, I’m haphazardly organising birthday parties, homework and play dates. I’m burning pizzas and missing school plays, concerts, and parent’s evenings.

I’m out of the playground and into the commute; away from the frying pan into the mire.

I’m trying to rally the troops, the children and my partner, with lists and memos; I have employed help – a cleaner and a child minder, and I know what a luxury that is.

And yet, and yet…

The jumble and scatter of life squeezes out my writing, these words that are my yoga and my Prozac.

Working life smooths out my edges as I polish myself down and re-imagine a woman I had forgotten; Our Lady of the Meeting, Doyenne of the Filofax, Director of Deadlines. Employee.

No more coffee mornings. No more spending hours honing a blog piece about pants or being a wanker mum.

I’ve been away from office life for so long, I fear that my brain is no longer malleable enough to accommodate the new connections I need to make. All my neurological pathways lead to my kids; they are my entrenched pattern, my learned behaviour.

While my part-time existence as a writer was isolating and badly paid, there was space. Time to reflect and get some perspective… too much fucking perspective to quote what’s-his-face from Spinal Tap.

It is a special kind of asthmatic wheeze, this squeezing out of the days, this stringing out of the hours to the last mote of air. Where are the morsels of time, those spaces in which we breathe?

Tell me how you do this thing you fellow working mums…

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Graphic Novelist Glyn Dillon: Access All Areas

Catching The Comet'sTailThis week’s Catching the Comet’s Tail features graphic novelist Glyn Dillon. His book, The Nao of Brown, tells the darkly beautiful story of Nao, a half-Japanese woman who falls in love with a washing machine repairman. Dillon’s illustrations are stylistically diverse and sublimely coloured, making Nao one of the most exquisite tomes I have on my bookshelf. Earlier this year, Glyn was awarded the Prix Spécial du Jury at this year’s comic book equivalent of the Oscars, the Angoulême International Festival Of Bande Dessinée. I was curious to discover whether Glyn’s creative process differs whether he is writing or drawing. Here’s what he had to say…

Glynn DillonGlyn on creativity and the creative process.

“Is creativity within me? Hmm… I’d say there’s something somewhere, I don’t know where, like there’s an ‘ideasphere’ and that’s where all the good stuff is. When you’re tuned in to that, things just  flow, both with writing and drawing. So it’s a case of trying to get an ‘Access All Areas’ pass for that. But really that’s only the half of it, because there’s also a lot of cliched crap. I’m the ‘ideasphere’, so once I’ve got whatever it is I want down on paper, I need the editor part of my brain to come in and sort it all out to re-write or re-draw it. Being truly productive for me, is when I’m able to get those two very different ways of working to dance together in time.”

Was creativity encouraged in you as a child?

“Absolutely. My dad and brother are artists and my mum and sister are both very creative too. My brother was probably the biggest influence though. He was already drawing comics professionally having started aged 16. When I was 17, I met and became friends with Jamie Hewlett (creator of Tank Girl & Gorillaz) who inspired and influenced me in other ways, especially in his work ethic.”

How long did it take to put together The Nao of Brown? Can you recall the first spark of inspiration and is the finished work what you originally envisioned?

“The original idea for The Nao of Brown was sparked by my eldest boy. When he was about 18months old, he was scared of our washing machine – not when it was on and whizzing round – but when the door was open. He was scared of that dark hole. That led to the inspiration for Gregory, the washing machine repairman, and in his story, Nao was going to be his  love interest.  At the time I was learning to meditate, which also coincided with me learning my wife had suffered with OCD as a child and into her late teens. All these things combined over a weird three day period and the major elements of the story fell into place. Nao upgraded herself to being the main protagonist after it became obvious that she should have OCD. I wanted to learn as much as possible about the condition and this seemed as good a way as any.

Those early ideas were bubbling up around 2008 and I finished the book in May 2012. I had to take on storyboarding jobs as well so I wasn’t able to work on Nao full-time until the last seven months when I worked seven days a week, 9.00am to 3.00am, which was pretty tough going.

How did you know the book was finished?

“Well, I guess when I was high on drugs, in hospital because of my back, but was still going over the wet proofs for the dust jacket… even after  I was discharged, I was still being picky about things when I got home. I guess I found it difficult to let go. But I suppose I knew it was really finished when my publisher handed me a fresh copy out of a box that was full of them. That was a great feeling.”

Who, what or where always inspires your creativity and what, if anything, is guaranteed to kill it?

“Travelling is always good for inspiration because suddenly all the usual things, the everyday, commonplace things are a little different (or very different depending on where you are).  I find this visually exciting and inspiring, the senses feel that bit more heightened. Also, architecture inspires me – having a new sense of place sparks my imagination.

In terms of writing, I find solitude a necessity. Ideas are elusive, slippery things; you have to listen out for them carefully so you can’t afford to have any other voices in the room. With drawing however, it’s not always the same. Once the layouts have been thumbnailed, it’s possible to listen to the radio or music with lyrics and work at the same time.

I have to be able to create a safe bubble. If outside worries or stresses intrude, it can become impossible to work and those things will need sorting before I can carry on.”

Do you ever feel that creating new things is a chore? What do you do when you feel blocked creatively?

“If I’m creating new things for myself, whether it be a book or a sandcastle with the kids, then no. However, if I’m working on a film and I don’t quite have that ‘taste alignment’ with the director, then yes, sometimes it can feel like a chore and I become fully aware of my ‘gun for hire’ position. I sometimes have to look hard for something in a bad idea that can hold my interest for the duration. But some twisted part of me enjoys that challenge.

I’m not a real believer in writer’s or artist’s block. In my experience, if you’re having a bad day where nothing is flowing, you just have to keep working, even if you know it’s shit. Eventually you’ll turn a corner and it’s all the more satisfying knowing that you’ve worked your way through it. Maybe what people are talking about when they say ‘writer’s block’ is either fear, or even depression – but that’s obviously a different thing entirely.”

Is there a collaborative element to your work? 

“Storyboarding film and commercials have paid the mortgage over the last seventeen years, and that’s quite a collaborative process. What I enjoy most about it is that my job isn’t the end product, it’s just part of the process. Once used, it’s disposable; only a handful of people get to see it. This is a very good exercise for the artist’s ego. It freed me up a lot, so when I came back to comics, to doing Nao, I think I was much freer than I had been in the past with regards to my work.”

Please talk a bit about the environment you like to be in to write. 

Glynn Dillon's Desk

Glynn’s ‘messy’ desk

“We’d just had our attic converted when I started on Nao, so that became my workspace. When writing, I shifted my days around so that I was working through the night and sleeping in the day. I wrote the whole book before I started drawing. I wrote it in a film script format, with no page breaks, and went through six drafts before I felt I could start thumbnailing. It took three months of nights to get through those six drafts. I saw more of the kids during the week because I would wake up around 4pm and not start work until they’d gone to bed. This was great, except weekends were hard on my wife because I was sleeping in the day. I consider myself very lucky in that department; my wife and family were completely understanding and supportive of me. I know it wasn’t always easy on them, so I’m very grateful. So, getting back to the question, my ‘environment’ was, and is, my family. And when that relationship is good and supportive, it makes the work so much easier.

When writing I only listen to wordless things – lots of soundtracks or foreign language stuff – 60s Bollywood soundtracks are a particular favourite. In the early stages of note taking and gathering ideas for Nao, I  listened to a lot of music that I thought Nao would like. A lot of this was stuff I wouldn’t listen to myself, but it really helped with the building of her character.”

Did you have a daily routine when you were writing/drawing Nao

“After the writing stage of Nao was over, I returned to daytimes and stuck quite rigidly to working 9.30-6.30, six days a week, and then sometimes I’d work in the evenings as well. I always tried to get out of the house to eat lunch and read the paper. Otherwise those four walls would quickly become oppressive. Luckily, my ‘commute’ was only upstairs so if I felt the need to see some smiling little faces, it wasn’t far to go.

I’m definitely more of a night person, always have been, but having small children isn’t conducive to that lifestyle. Once they’re teenagers I’m sure I’ll edge back more towards what feels like my natural state.”

Please share a photo of an object that connects with your creative process and tell us about it. 

Daruma Netsuke

“This is something my wife gave me and I can still remember the shock felt by both me and my eldest son when I first opened it. I tipped it slightly and his eyes popped out!  It made us both really jump. It’s a Daruma Netsuke [miniature Japanese sculpture] and Daruma is a direct inspiration for Gregory [the washing machine repairman in Nao].”

Which other creative art form outside the one you are known for do you wish you could master or have you mastered another that we don’t know about yet?

“It would be nice to play a musical instrument but I never seem to find the time. And I’ve always fancied the idea of a bit of topiary in my retirement years (if they ever come).”

How did becoming a parent affect your creativity?

“I think it’s safe to say it made me work harder. I was nervous because our second son was due at the same time I was due to start on the book. I had no idea how that was gonna work out. The saying that goes, “It’s never the right time to have a child,” could just as easily apply to writing a book. You just have to get on with it and deal with things as they come up.”

Please say as much or as little as you’d like about your next creative project.

“At the moment I’m working on a film, as a concept artist in the costume dept. I’m also at the fun stage of a new book project. Trying to remain alert and aware of everything going on around me that might become a part of the book. So far I have a setting, a protagonist, a theme. I think I’m going to try a more improvisational approach with this one, I just need to get hold of that ‘Access All Areas’ pass.”

Nao of Brown Glynn Dillon Glyn’s graphic novel The Nao of Brown is available now, published by Self Made Hero.  Follow Glyn on Twitter or find out more from his website www.naobrown.com.

Next week’s Catching the Comet’s Tail features musician KT Tunstall talking about her creative process.

Author Matt Haig: Loving the Alien

CatchingTheCometsTailThis week, Catching the Comet’s Tail features author Matt Haig. I like to imagine that if, by some time-bending miracle, Rene Descartes could meet David Bowie at a space cafe where the only thing on the menu is peanut butter served on slices of philosophical bread, Matt would be there taking notes. Haig’s latest novel, The Humans, is a simple yet moving story that will have you weeping at the beauty and futility of it all. Welcome to the world of an author who puts the ‘sigh’ in sci-fi.

Matt Haig

Matt Haig photo by Clive Doyle

Matt on creativity…

“I think writing sometimes comes from intense experiences. You are not necessarily writing about those experiences but it helps me that I have had them. I think the body and the mind are very closely linked. When I used to have panic attacks, it was my heart and my mind going crazy together. You feel things and experience things and somehow these experiences turn into stories. It is a mystery. If you write non-fiction then you write with a clear knowledge of where your words stem from, but with fiction you are generally asking questions, not giving answers.”

Was creativity encouraged in you as a child and who were your early literary influences?

“I was quite bookish but didn’t go to a school where being bookish was a good thing, so I often used to hide the fact from my friends. I loved all the usuals – Dahl, Jansson, SE Hinton…then, as a teen, Stephen King in a major way. But I think a lot of the writer sensibility comes from staring out of windows. I used to do that a lot, wrapped up in the comfort of my own imagination. My parents also took me to the theatre a lot and our house was a house of books.”

How long did it take to write The Humans and can you recall the first spark of inspiration?

“The Humans took me over a decade, technically, because I first had the idea for it in 2000 when I was suffering from panic disorder, and feeling alienated from the rest of my species. However, I was scared of writing it as a first novel for 2 reasons – firstly, I didn’t want to be labelled as a sci-fi writer, which technically this story is (in subject if not in spirit), and secondly, even though it was a fantasy, the story felt strangely personal, and it took a while to get the degree of honesty necessary. I needed to look at myself properly, and when you are 25 and trying to be cool that’s hard. The concept changed through the editing process. I am deeply proud of this book and don’t mind shouting about it from the rooftops. I think it is by far the best thing I have ever done, but it only got that way with the help of my editor at Canongate, Francis Bickmore. You see, the first draft would have literally alienated most readers. He told me to think of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and feed the weirdness in gradually and that is what I tried to do. And you know [a book] is finished when you have exhausted your editor and he says it is finished.”

Who, what or where always inspires your creativity, no matter what? And what, if anything, is guaranteed to kill it?

“I can only work at home. Preferably in my attic. But I can have music on or even the TV. I have tinnitus, so quiet is more distracting than noise. Twitter is a creativity-killer though.”

 What do you do when you feel blocked creatively?

“Go for a run. Or, if in a serious slump, get away on holiday.”

Please share a photo of something that connects with your writing process.

Matt Haig's Peanut Butter

Every writer needs it…peanut butter.

“My writing staple… peanut butter.”

Is there a collaborative element to your work? 

“Well, I have a great editor. And my wife is a writer, so I show her stuff and she tells me what she likes and what she doesn’t. But I am a shut-myself-away kind of writer to be honest.”

Where do you most like to be when you write, and do you have a daily routine? 

Matt Haig Writing

Matt’s favourite writing place.

“I hate writing at a desk so I can normally be found lounging around my house. This is my favourite spot.

I work three times as well in the morning as the afternoon. For every sentence I write in the afernoon, I can write a paragraph in the morning. So my rule is: START EARLY, FINISH EARLY.”

Which other creative art form outside the one you are known for do you wish you could master?

“I’d like to be a film director. My Dad is an architect. I’d love to design a building.”

How did becoming a parent affect your creativity?

“You have less time, so you become more productive. You use the time you have more wisely. You become more disciplined. I also think I have a more optimistic world-view. My style has become a little bit sunnier I think.”

What are you working on next?

“I have been asked to write a screenplay for The Humans. So, that!”

The Humans Matt HaigYou can find out more about Matt on his blog, or find him on Twitter and Facebook. His novel The Humans is out now from Canongate  Books.

Author Rosie Fiore: Hooking the Thread

CatchingTheCometsTailThis week, Catching the Comet’s Tail features author Rosie Fiore. Her second novel, Wonder Women, is a brilliantly observed, multi-layered story about three women at a crossroads in their lives. Through her engaging, realistic cast of characters, Fiore tackles important issues such as motherhood, marriage, female friendship and ambition. Rosie has two children and is addicted to coffee; she is, therefore, my kind of woman. I suspect she may be yours too.

rosie_fiore

Rosie on creativity and the creative process…

“It’s a funny old thing for me, the process of creating… a combination of sheer drudge and moments of breath-taking inspiration. But the best way I can describe it is as a slow, endless percolation of ideas, experiences, things you’ve heard. It’s that percolation that slowly knits itself into stories. Sometimes it’s clear which elements have led to which stories, sometimes it’s not, and then it’s as surprising to me as it would be to a reader. I always imagine my mind as a pond (I know… go with me). I dip my hand in and swirl it around, and when I am lucky, I hook a thread with a single finger. If I pull slowly and carefully and well, the whole net of the story will rise beautifully to the surface. It’s in there. I just need to let it come.”

Was creativity encouraged in you as a child and who were your early inspirations?

“My father painted and played the piano, my mum was wonderful with languages, and we were all encouraged to pursue our interests and grow. They were hugely supportive. My parents (and to a certain extent, my teachers at school), recognised me as a writer long before I did myself. I wanted to be an actor. I found writing to solitary and even though I knew I had a talent for it, I shied away from it for years.

I had to argue quite hard to get the chance to study drama at university, not because my parents didn’t support it, but because they wanted me to be able to earn a living. But I did get to go, and found the Drama Department at Wits University a fertile and exciting creative playground, I learned so much there, and I am proud to number many people from my years there as close friends. Creative giants all of them.”

How long did it take to write Wonder Women and can you recall the first spark of inspiration? 

“Wonder Women is my fifth book, and was definitely the easiest to write. The first draft simply poured out. I couldn’t type fast enough to get it down. It took the first five months of last year, and then I spent the second half of 2012, revising it with my agent and editor. I came up with the idea on the day I finished Babies in Waiting, because the themes of women balancing work and family made it such a logical follow on from the plot of Babies.

I knew which issues I wanted to cover in the book, and before I began, had a clear idea of my main characters, but as always, as I wrote and they developed and gained detail, they took some slightly different routes. Charlotte van Wijk, who edited the manuscript, gave wonderful advice in the later drafts on fleshing out some of the relationships, and making them much stronger.

When is a book finished? Finishing is always the hardest thing to do. I really don’t like stories where all the ends are neatly tied up. I like to suggest some possibilities, but keep the options open. A few reviewers have said they felt Wonder Women needed another chapter, but it was very much my intention to leave all the characters with choices and allow the reader to decide what they thought might happen. I’m not one for a “happily ever after” scenario.”

Who, what or where always inspires your creativity and what, if anything, blocks it?

“Coffee. Coffee is my friend, Seriously, I am badly addicted. It began when my small son was a baby who didn’t sleep. He is now nearly four and still not a great sleeper. Coffee (and carbs) became the only way to get though the day. I’m better at the carbs, but making a pot of coffee and sitting down with a cup is a vital part of the writing ritual.

What stands in my way? Stuff. Life. Paying work (I’m a freelance copywriter), that needs hours of time and attention. Children. Housework. Facebook. Twitter. One can always find time, even if it’s at 11pm, but keeping enough clear headspace can be a challenge.

Writing novels is officially the most fun I have ever had with my clothes on. There is nothing I would rather do. Sometimes there are parts of the job (line-editing for example), that can be tedious, and going over and over the same manuscript can make you lose the will to live, but I try not to lose sight of the miracle that I am actually a published novelist, and what a joy the whole thing is.

As for being blocked, a friend who is a journalist once said rather sniffily, “There’s no such thing as writer’s block”, and I think for hacks like him and me, that’s true. I write every day for a living, and I have for twenty years. I have to produce or I don’t get paid. I take that “Dammit, get something… anything on the page” attitude into my novel writing. As long as you keep going, things tend to resolve themselves.”

Where do you most like to be when you write and do you have a routine?

The ubiquitous coffee cup...

The ubiquitous coffee cup… Rosie’s desk

“I usually write at my desk at home, in our living room. My husband is an IT engineer so I have a good PC with a massive monitor. My desk (pictured) is always a mess though, piled with papers, pens, and often toys that three-year-old Ted has brought to me as I sit there. When I need a change, I find it hugely useful to go to a coffee shop to write, although I abhor this new-fangled modern tradition of offering Wi-Fi everywhere. The best reason to write in a coffee shop (besides the good coffee), is to avoid procrastinating and surfing the Net. I am quite superstitious about the coffee shops where I’ve done good work and love to go back there – the Caffe Nero in Edgware is a total winner. I also did some fabulous work in the little cottage in Cornwall where we had a holiday in March. Breath-taking sea views, peace… and zero Internet (seeing a pattern here?)

I tend not to play music, but I am quite oblivious to noise, happy to write while my family watches TV or chats. I can tune it out.

Like most writers, I also have to work, and I have to care for a three-year-old, so I carve the novel-writing hours out day by day. Sometimes I’m lucky and get to work in the morning when Ted is at nursery, but more often than not, I won’t get to write till he’s in bed. When doing a first draft, I write 1200 words a day, every day, no exceptions.”

Is there a collaborative element to your writing process?

“I write alone, but my husband Tom is an utterly invaluable support. He brings drinks to me when I am writing late at night, listens to me wrestle through plot points, makes great suggestions and loves me though every stage. I’m proud to say Wonder Women is dedicated to him, because it wouldn’t have been written without him.

Also, with any book, you end up writing about things you know nothing about, and people are always so amazingly helpful. From the woman who talked me through her children’s clothing business to the friend who told me about studying at Goldsmith’s in the 1990s, and the colleague of my husband’s who helped me choose an authentic Indian Hindu name for a character, I salute them all.”

Please share a special object that connects with your writing.

Fiore's Quartz Coaster“This is my quartz slab, which I use as a coaster for the ubiquitous coffee cup. It comes from a happy family trip to the Natural History Museum. I think it’s beautiful, and it is the same colour as the amethyst in my engagement ring. So to me it stands for love, connectedness, family, and coffee. Yup. That’s all the important stuff.”

Which other creative art form outside the one you are known for do you wish you could master?

“Here’s my secret wish… I wish I could dance. I am five foot ten and clod-hoppingly clumsy. I started ballet and dance at sixteen, much too old to gain any real skills, and while I did it at university, was never any good at all. But in my dreams… oh, in my dreams I am a petal on the wind, or a petal in Artem Chigvintsev’s arms when I get to go on the writers’ only version of Strictly Come Dancing. Seriously though, I do still do some acting (amateur only), when I get the chance, and I sing in a choir. And I love to cook.”

How did becoming a parent affect your creativity?

“Bloody children. Time-thieves the lot of them. And heart thieves. And teachers of wit and emotion, and challengers of patience… On a practical level, being a parent makes creating much harder, just because I have less energy and time than I might have as a non-parent. But on a visceral level, I think it makes me a better writer than I would have been. My sons (Matt who is 20 and Ted who is 3), made me into a grown up. I believe they made me a less selfish, more compassionate and better version of myself, and that gives me more depth and experience to write from. Then they stole all my sleep and most of my waking hours. Sigh.”

What are you working on next?

“I am maybe halfway into a first draft of a new book, tentatively titled Were Those the Days. It’s about memory and nostalgia, about the narratives we create around our past, and how we use those to define ourselves and our present. But what if the people from your past come to get you, and those people don’t remember things in quite the same way? And what if what you believed in for all those years was just plain… wrong?”

You can find out more about Rosie on her website www.rosiefiore.com  Twitter @rosiefiore  and Facebook Rosie Fiore.

Rosie Fiore Wonder Women Wonder Women, published by Quercus, is available now on Kindle. You can also pre-order the paperback here.

Elizabeth Fremantle: Tea, Toast and Not Losing Your Head

CatchingTheCometFinalWelcome to Catching the Comet’s Tail, a series of interviews with writers, artists and musicians discussing creativity and their creative process. To launch the series, I am delighted to welcome English author Elizabeth Fremantle. Her first novel, Queen’s Gambit, based on the life of Henry VIII’s sixth wife Katherine Parr,  had me gripped from the first page until the last. I happen to know that, not only is she a gifted writer, she is also a demon at Scrabble. 

Elizabeth on defining creativity and the creative process…

Elizabeth Fremantle

Author Elizabeth Fremantle

“I am pragmatic about creativity. I am not of the view, for example, that I am the catalyst for some mysterious alchemical process. For me writing (and I’m talking here about the production of extended pieces of fiction) is more craft than art; it is something you teach yourself to do and it improves with practice. Certainly there are character traits that suggest a propensity for the craft, all rather dull, I’m afraid: discipline, a desire for solitude, swottiness and the ability to consume vast quantities of tea and toast, because when you are on a roll the last thing you want to do is come over all Nigella. No amount of talent can compensate for hard work but it is true that some people have an extra something that just makes them better than everyone else (not me, I might add) but even those people have to work hard. If I have a muse at all, it is the accumulated knowledge from all the books I have ever read and resides in an unwieldy and unreliably accessed conglomeration in my head.”

Was creativity encouraged in you as a child and who were your early inspirations?

“In my family ‘creative’ was what you were when you were not ‘academic’ and it meant that your education didn’t really matter; I was not considered ‘academic’. Reading was my refuge from an eccentric family and an effective mask for my social inadequacy. I read anything I could get my hands on from Jean Plaidy to Somerset Maugham, via Gerald Durrell and Agatha Christie. Often when I finished books I would start them all over again immediately. The only thing I ever wanted to become was a writer because I saw it as a way to create worlds for people to inhabit, who felt they didn’t fit in the actual world; but not being ‘academic’ made me believe it would never be possible. In my thirties I thought ‘sod it,’ and went to university. It turned out I was ‘academic’!”

How long did it take to write Queen’s Gambit and can you recall the first spark of inspiration? 

“I had written a number of novels, none of which had found a publisher and was beginning to think that perhaps I didn’t have what it takes to be a novelist. I was writing intense, writerly stories about young, messed-up posh girls, despite knowing that there was no market for such things. It was a colleague, a literary scout for whom I worked, who suggested I think about who I was writing for. It occurred to me only then to think of writing the kind of books I have always most enjoyed reading rather than the kind I thought I ought to write. I was intrigued by Katherine Parr because she was the wife everyone thought was rather dull and yet she was the one who survived. The more I researched her the more I realized that she had been miscast by history and I felt compelled to explore her story in fiction. Once I started, I was on a mission; it took me about eighteen months and I did really create the book I set out to write, which is actually more difficult than it sounds. I don’t know if you ever know that a novel is finished; in my case I simply have to decide that I must stop tinkering. There is not a passage I read in the ‘finished’ book that I don’t still want to change.”

Who, what or where always inspires you?

“My inspiration is most usually derived from reading but sometimes I will wander round an old building or look at a view or a portrait and the ideas begin to pop into my head. For example I was at a wedding the other day in Richmond Park and, driving through the deer park to get there, my mind started firing off. Once we were there I was mesmerized by the view from the back of the building, a landscape blurred by rain that I imagined had changed little in five hundred years. It is at moments like that when my characters begin to make themselves heard. Sometimes it flows and sometimes it doesn’t, there is no rhyme or reason to it.

I don’t believe in writers’ block. I have good days and bad but it’s just a job and the world would come to a halt if everyone else decided that they couldn’t do their job because they weren’t ‘feeling it’. I did say I was a pragmatist.

I write completely alone. It works better for me that way. I do, however belong to a writer’s group, the function of which is more moral than editorial support. It is necessarily a solitary business being a novelist, and sometimes it’s helpful to know people who are striving for similar ends. When you start banging on about your characters as if they are actually people in your life, they are less likely than your regular friends to glaze over, or think you’ve lost your marbles. I never, ever show my work to friends or family until it is ready for publication (which seems to annoy lots of people) but I have one or two trusted editors who give me notes on earlier drafts.”

Elizabeth's writing desk

Elizabeth’s writing desk

Where do you most like to be when you write and do you have a routine?

“I definitely work best at my desk with all my reference books around me and an internet connection to fact-check as I go along. I like silence and my dogs sleeping at my feet. I’m not very good at being portable. Comfort and warmth are key and the best thing about being a writer is that you can go to work in your pyjamas. I often think people are disappointed when they meet me because I used to be a Vogue fashion editor and I am never wearing the kind of thing they expect – its always a version of pyjamas really.

I’m absolutely a morning person but can, and do, work in any moment when the desire arises. I have been known to sit at my desk after a night out, having had one two many glasses of wine, and start thumping away at the keyboard – see above mention of wedding in Richmond – sometimes this produces diamonds but often drivel. When I am writing a new draft of something my rule is to write a minimum of 1,000 words a day. I am very strict about this and it suits me perfectly. I rarely sacrifice other things to write as there’s nothing I’d rather be doing.”

Please share a special object that connects with your writing.

“I bought this miniature (see picture below) to celebrate my first publishing deal and though I don’t invest it with any kind of talismanic powers, it does remind me of the joy I felt when I knew I was going to be earning my living doing the thing I love best. It is a Victorian copy of a Nicholas (who is in my next book) Hilliard original of Mary Queen of Scots by George Perfect Harding.”

Victorian copy of a Nicholas Hilliard original of Mary Queen of Scots by George Perfect Harding.

Victorian copy of a Nicholas Hilliard original of Mary Queen of Scots by George Perfect Harding.

Which other creative art form outside the one you are known for do you wish you could master?

“I’m hopeless at everything else though I did make a couple of rather good human beings once.”

How did becoming a parent affect your creativity?

“I really have absolutely no idea, though being a single mother has made me very time efficient.”

What are you working on next?

“Queen’s Gambit is the first of a Tudor trilogy. The second book takes place a few years later in time and though I don’t revisit any of my protagonist’s stories, there are a few minor characters who reappear. Queen Jane’s Shadow (out in May 2014) tells of the two younger sisters of the tragically executed Lady Jane Grey, one of whom, Lady Mary is a four foot hunchback. In the period physical deformity was regarded with great suspicion and often linked to the demonic in people’s minds, so Mary’s perspective on the court is coloured by this. Lady Catherine is the capricious beauty of the family and in love with the idea of love, something that eventually becomes her downfall. I intertwine their stories with that of a female court painter, Levina Teerlinc, who was remarkable in that she was earning her living from her work in a time when women rarely set foot beyond the domestic arena. It is all set against the backdrop of the turbulent and bloody Tudor succession.

The third novel, which I am working on now, focuses on the life of the ‘decadent’ Penelope Devereaux who scandalised the late Elizabethan court.”

You can find out more about Elizabeth on her website www.elizabethfremantle.com Twitter @LizFremantle Facebook Elizabeth Fremantle.

QGcoverQueen’s Gambit is available now in hardback, published by Michael Joseph.

Next week’s Catching the Comet’s Tail features Swedish contemporary artist Ylva Kunze talking creativity, kids and paintbrushes. Please follow #ctct on Twitter.